Skip to Content


Best of Menswear

Come take a look at some of the most creative and timeless jewelry pieces in men’s fashion:

The first find is an eye-catching Royal Oak Offshore wristwatch collection. This line of timepieces combines function and design by allowing the engineering components of the watch to show through its face. They come in incredible, high-tech motifs while still maintaining a sleek look in gold, silver, black, and more.

If you’re looking for something a bit less traditional than something to keep the time, you may want to try the William Henry snake pendant. This serpentine creature is made of dull silver, giving it a rather edgy appearance. Designed with intricate scales, its head seems more like a dragon than a snake with eyes that pierce as deep as the fangs in its open mouth.

For a classy look that never goes out of style, you can’t go wrong with the Grand Band’s cufflink pairs. The options range from contemporary to traditional and come in a range of styles. For a minimalist vibe, Grand Band offers a pair of onyx cufflinks with one silver circles enclosed in a larger onyx one; for a grittier look the silver and cubic zirconia skull-shaped cufflinks. There are also more traditional pieces, like the plain rectangular pair engraved with a single “M” at the center. Feel free to take a peak and pick out something that speaks to you.

A Time for Cloisonné

Cloisonné is a French word that refers to an ancient and meticulously detailed technique for designing metalwork. This technique, which requires thin silver or gold wire strips to separate the object into compartments, has been used for clothing, weapons, and jewelry, among other things. From its place of origin — the Ancient Near East — this style traveled eastward, reaching China in the 14th century. The “compartments” (called cloisons) made by wire edges were filled with brightly colored gemstones and glass inlays or, in more recent eras, enamel. These inlays are made into intricate and ornate patterns that inevitably attract the eye. It’s not surprising, therefore, that pieces of jewelry with this design would fetch a heavy sum. Especially one that is also a timepiece, where this tricky design technique is made even more complex by the presence of the inner gears and outer hands that move along the watch’s face. A wristwatch made with a cloisonné dial is fairly rare. Even rarer — given this method’s frailty — is a cloisonné dial that is still in perfect, never-been-repaired, condition.

For these reasons, the 18-karat gold Rolex in Christie’s December auction of Important Watches attracted an impressive sum. The dial of this automatic wristwatch depicts an exquisitely colorful map of the Western Hemisphere, replete with fish and seagull shapes and daggers as well as a polychrome cloisonné compass in the bottom left quarter of the face. After an estimate of $200,000-$400,000 value, the piece sold in New York for $425,000. A great catch, according to Jeffrey Hess, who co-wrote a book about Rolex watches. Hess generally avoids offering advice to collectors about what to buy, but when it comes to cloisonné dial watches, he is more than willing to break his own rule. They are, as he explains, “the crowning glory of any collection.”

The Price is Right

Engagement rings have been part of pre­-wedding tradition for quite a while now, and it certainly needs factoring ­in when considering one’s overall wedding budget.  In years past, there was a pretty simple scale for how to determine your engagement ring price range.  The unofficial rule was, rather simply, that the cost of the engagement ring would equal two months’ worth of paychecks.

Now tradition has become a bit more flexible, which ­­ for those who appreciate an easy ­to ­remember rule like that ­­ may leave you floundering for what to look for.  Well, while we may not have a magical solution to offer, here are a few facts and factors to consider: First, you can always play it safe by conforming to the national average.  According to The Knot’s annual wedding survey, the average cost of an engagement ring is about five and a half thousand dollars.  Twelve percent of couples will top that by spending more than $8,000 on their bling.

If you’re on a tight budget, you can always trick your diamond into thinking it’s bigger than it is; a shallow stone with a larger surface area may not sparkle as well, but it will appear much larger overall than its actual size.  Another good option is to look at products a hair below the next karat (for example, 1.8 instead of 2 karats), which can save as much as 20% on costs without diminishing the clarity of the gem.

Of course, your best option would be to discuss and decide on your alternatives together as a couple. It used to be commonplace for the groom ­to surprise his lady with a ring he picked himself, but the rules have changed quite a bit since then. In a recent study, it seems that that decision ­making technique accounts for only 5% of the current population.  More prevalent now, comprising an overwhelming 69% of couples,­­ is to decide on rings together.

Here’s our last major tip: If you’re still concerned about your engagement ring… don’t be! Although the ring carries large significance in matrimonial tradition, it is by no means the only bit of jewelry seen during the wedding.  Studies show that over 80% of brides will receive additional jewelry for their big day,­­ most commonly earrings, but also pendants, wristwatches, tiaras, and other hair accessories. For grooms, a lower percentage, but still considerable at 30%, ­­ will wear additional jewelry: along with the wedding band often come cuff links, watches, bracelets, money clips, and even necklaces. So don’t stress yourself out over the smaller details, and let yourself enjoy the celebration!



A type of jewelry that doesn’t often get talked about is the hairpin. Its quiet status doesn’t detract from its value, though: a hairpin can complete an outfit. A row of white fabric flowers, for example, can turn you into a blushing bride while bow­tie shaped barrettes exude a vintage feel.

The Mel Bernie Company (also known as the 1928 Jewelry Company) has quite a selection in this range: silver­ and copper­tone butterfly barrettes or ornate clips with black oval gemstones tucked in a row of three.  There are more classic styles, like hair combs, one of which, ­­ also from The Mel Bernie Company, ­­ is studded with different shapes of real Swarovski crystals.

You can also opt for the bohemian look with any one of countless brightly colored feather hairpin styles. Those include peacock feathers that hug the scalp while showing off an array of purples, blues, and pinks as well as clip-­in feathers that dangle within your locks of hair.  Their best attribute is their versatility; they look great not only in your hair but anywhere! Try them clipped to your shirt or pinned to a chain and worn as a necklace. With these lovely pins, anything goes.


What’s a Guy to Wear?

One place you’ll be sure to find some great pieces is David Yurman, a company that provides an excellent selection of goods even in an area that often gets neglected — namely, men’s jewelry.

Along with some things you might expect — like sleek cufflinks or military tags — David Yurman also has a wide variety of collections exclusively for the male population. These include lines like Chevron, Streamline, and Faceted Metal, all aptly named for the products they encompass. The Chevron Collection boasts a triple¬wrap of black braided leather that closes via a magnetic clasp of sterling silver.  The Streamline Collection comes in a range of colors, like the Heirloom Signet Ring, a sterling silver squarish band set with a rectangular gemstone of either jade, black jade, or pietersite. (The ring is also sold without a stone, leaving just the smooth silver facet as its surface.)

The most variety, however, may come from the Faceted Metal Collection, which brings an ‘edgy’ dimension to jewelry. The multi-edged metal cuff topped with 18-karat rose gold has simplicity that gives it a clean, contemporary feel. Another companion in the line is made of silver lobster claw shapes that each clasp the end of another to form a sharp, funky bracelet. If you’re a guy who feels left out of the jewelry market, David Yurman is a great place to get in on the action!


Shoes and More

Here’s a jewelry line you may not have expected (or expected us to highlight): One Wink, the new jewelry collection from DSW, the Designer Shoe Warehouse.  DSW has been designing shoes for over twenty years years and have long been purveyors of handbags and similar accessories, but as of last year they broadened their range to encompass adornments of the gold and silver variety.  One Wink offers options for diverse style preferences, including both timeless elegance (like the Pearl 360 Stud Earrings) and contemporary chic (like the Multi Circle Twist Drop Earrings, which boasts a row of six gold- or silver-colored twisted-up circles).

It seems this production decision has worked out well for DSW because, since the introduction of One Wink, they have added another handful of inexpensive selections to the online store. Natasha’s Smooth Hoop Earrings (minimalist hoops with rhinestone accents) and her MultiColor Stone Bib Necklace (silver link-chain with a row of five pentagonal arrangements of colorful stones).

Only time will tell if DSW’s secondary category will continue to profit, but after a year of success they have gotten off to more than a good start.


A Brooch for Every Occasion

Some people are under the impression that brooches belong with an antiquated set of ornaments that don’t fit with the glamour and pizzazz of modern society.  But if you’re of that mind set, you may want to think again!  It’s true brooches were a common component of Victorian dress, from which brooches get the then-common oval shape bearing the portrait silhouette of a woman.  While that particular style may no longer be in fashion, brooches have plenty more to offer — both in the past and present day.  Brooches came into vogue long before the eighteenth century.  In fact, since they have existed as far back as the Bronze Age and since their style changes in quick fads, brooches can be excellent clues in identifying historical time periods.

But brooches are more than just relics of history.  As jewelry styles have modernized, so have they: pieces like a Georg Jensen brooch designed by Henning Koppel in a biomorphic figure eight-like shape. For rougher options there is Giorgio Armani’s tarantula brooch, its body made of one perfectly round black gemstone with head and legs made of tiny studded diamonds.

Even how you choose to wear it can add some flair. Though traditionally worn on or near the lapel, a brooch can go anywhere!  Try it on the hip of your dress, as a scarf fastener, or to close a vest.  You can try clusters of smaller brooches that share a motif, rather than one single larger piece.  There’s no reason to cast off brooches as the fashions of the past, not when they are still unquestionably at the height of design.


« Previous Entries