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Engagement Annual Survey

Of all milestones in life, weddings are possibly the most steeped in cultural significance. After all, the prospect of forgoing a reception — in lieu of simply a visit to a government building for a marriage license — would fill most people with disappointment. If you’re a traditionalist, then this special occasion may leave you with a slew of questions about how to fulfill those conventional expectations. Well, the XO Group Inc. (formerly The Knot) may be able to ease your concerns with its comprehensive Real Weddings Study, the results of which were released this past month.

These statistics won’t help you determine your personal cultural traditions, but they can at the very least identify some of the many factors found in an average wedding. And if you’re someone who likes to stand out from the crowd, then this report will tell you precisely what to avoid.  For example, the most popular month to get engaged is December, an engagement that lasts typically about fourteen months.

According to this same survey — as mentioned in a previous post — the average price of an engagement ring is documented at $5,855. That’s up nearly $300 from 2013’s $5,598.  Another useful fact to know when picking out your ring is that “round” the most common diamond shape used, with “princess” as the next likely option. In terms of material, you’ll find white gold far in the lead, taking over 73% of the population.

As for the bands exchanged during the ceremony itself, while last year’s final stats haven’t yet been publicized, the year before has quite a bit of information on the subject.  In 2013, more grooms wore wedding bands than brides (96% to 93%), which is an interesting and perhaps unexpected twist.  If you’re looking for most common metals, it will depend on which half of the couple you are; the most frequent choice for brides is — like the engagement ring — white gold, used by an overwhelming majority of the population (70%).  For grooms, meanwhile, the spread is much more diverse.  Only 27% of men go for a white gold band, which comes as a close second to the top metal — tungsten carbide — accounting for 32%.  Least common option?  For women it’s cobalt, at under 1%, whereas for men it’s the dainty rose gold.

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